Milk Makeup CBD Body Oil

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To be totally honest, before testing, I wasn’t really familiar with anything related to CBD. I’m no stranger to the plant it comes from though—my vape and edibles would wholeheartedly agree. Milk Makeup CBD + Arnica Solid Body Oil ingredients explained: C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Octyldodecanol, Cannabis Sativa [Hemp Seed Oil], Phenyl Trimethicone, Dibutyl Lauroyl Glutamide, Dibutyl Ethylhexanoyl Glutamide, Cannabidiol, Cannabigerol, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Salvia Sclarea (Clary) Oil, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Cymbopogon Flexuosus Oil, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Papaver Somniferum Seed Oil, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Tocopherol, Tocopheryl Acetate, Moringa Oil/Hydrogenated Moringa Oil Esters, Citric Acid, Phenoxyethanol

Milk Makeup’s CBD Body Oil Stick Is Relaxing AF

A few weeks ago I decided to try Milk Makeup’s CBD b ody o il s tick . To be totally honest, before testing, I wasn’t really familiar with CBD. I’m no stranger to the plant it comes from though—my vape and edibles would wholeheartedly agree.

Backstory. I’ve always had stiff shoulders. I even went to a chiropractor to adjust my neck so they wouldn’t be so sore. It worked, for the most part. But ever since I took up jogging more seriously in quarantine (out of complete boredom and isolation I might add), I’ve been using every type of cream to mitigate soreness without taking Advil or Tylenol. Like, I use them too much during my period anyway.

Now, we can discuss my poor running form at another time. As I’ve mentioned before, I’m used to different topical creams that aid in naturally relaxing tension in my muscles. One of my faves is actually Tiger Balm. My friend and I talk about how we love the tingle when it activates on your skin.

Milk Makeup’s CBD s tick doesn’t tingle, but it sure does make you relaxed. After a run, I would take a shower and moisturize with it. It’s made with arnica, which took me by surprise because you don’t actually smell it. It spreads like butter and whew! Made my skin moisturized AF. Now I will say I combined the CBD stick with other lotions and body oil because I’m Black and my skin tends to be dry.

I wouldn’t say the CBD stick started to kick in until a few minutes after I applied it to my legs, neck, and shoulders. After logging in for the day I felt . calm? That’s the only way to describe it. Calm and relaxed. When I continued to use the stick throughout the week I got the same sensation.

You’re not going to see a big change if you’re using it for sports-related relief. Even though I felt relaxed, my muscles were still a bit sore during the day. But if you’re feeling a bit stressed out and it expresses itself physically, this body oil can definitely help you. Again, nothing compares to the ganja, but the Milk Makeup CBD o il s tick is a close second.

Milk Makeup CBD Body Oil

An often used emollient with a light and silky feel. It’s very mild to both skin and eyes and spreads nicely and easily. It’s often used in sunscreens as it’s also an excellent solvent for sunscreen agents.

A clear, slightly yellow, odorless oil that’s a very common, medium-spreading emollient. It makes the skin feel nice and smooth and works in a wide range of formulas.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

A silicone fluid that gives a nonoily, easy to spread emolliency to the formulas. It is also used as a water repellent additive and to reduce the tackiness and stickiness of other ingredients. It also imparts gloss, softness and better manageability to hair.

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An amino acid ( L-Glutamic acid) based oil gelling agent that magically turns liquid oils into nice gels.

An amino acid (L-Glutamic acid) based oil gelling agent that magically turns liquid oils into nice gels. Often used togeather with fellow amino-acid based oil gelling agent, Dibutyl Lauroyl Glutamide.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

A nice yellow flower living in the mountains. It has been used as a herbal medicine for centuries, though its effect on skin is rather questionable. It’s most famously used to treat bruisings, but there are some studies that show that it’s not better than placebo (source: wikipedia). Also, some consider it to be anti-inflammatory, while other research shows that it can cause skin irritation.

The extract coming from the popular garden plant Calendula or Marigold. According to manufacturer info, it’s used for many centuries for its exceptional healing powers and is particularly remarkable in the treatment of wounds. It contains flavonoids that give the plant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

The extract coming from the juice containing leaves of the Aloe vera plant. It’s usually a hydroglycolic extract (though oil extract for the lipid parts also exists) that has similar moisturizing, emollient and anti-inflammatory properties as the juice itself. We have written some more about aloe here.

The extract coming from the lovely herb, rosemary. It contains lots of chemicals, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, and diterpenes. Its main active is rosmarinic acid, a potent antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory. It has also anti-bacterial, astringent and toning properties.

The leaves contain a small amount of essential oil (1-2%) with fragrant components, so if you are allergic to fragrance, it might be better to avoid it.

The emollient plant oil coming from the soybean. It is considered to be a nice, cost-effective base oil with moisturizing properties. As for its fatty acid profile, it contains 48-59% barrier-repairing linoleic acid, 17-30% nourishing oleic acid and also some (4.5-11%) potentially anti-inflammatory linolenic acid.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

Sunflower does not need a big intro as you probably use it in the kitchen as cooking oil, or you munch on the seeds as a healthy snack or you adore its big, beautiful yellow flower during the summer – or you do all of these and probably even more. And by even more we mean putting it all over your face as sunflower oil is one of the most commonly used plant oils in skincare.

It’s a real oldie: expressed directly from the seeds, the oil is used not for hundreds but thousands of years. According to The National Sunflower Association, there is evidence that both the plant and its oil were used by American Indians in the area of Arizona and New Mexico about 3000 BC. Do the math: it’s more than 5000 years – definitely an oldie.

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Our intro did get pretty big after all (sorry for that), so let’s get to the point finally: sunflower oil – similar to other plant oils – is a great emollient that makes the skin smooth and nice and helps to keep it hydrated. It also protects the surface of the skin and enhances the damaged or irritated skin barrier. Leslie Bauman notes in Cosmetic Dermatology that one application of sunflower oil significantly speeds up the recovery of the skin barrier within an hour and sustains the results 5 hours after using it.

It’s also loaded with fatty acids (mostly linoleic (50-74%) and oleic (14-35%)). The unrefined version (be sure to use that on your skin!) is especially high in linoleic acid that is great even for acne-prone skin. Its comedogen index is 0, meaning that it’s pretty much an all skin-type oil.

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Truth be told, there are many great plant oils and sunflower oil is definitely one of them.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

Also-called: Olive Fruit Oil | What-it-does: antioxidant, emollient, perfuming | Irritancy: 0 | Comedogenicity: 0-2

You probably know olive oil from the kitchen as a great and healthy option for salad dressing but it’s also a great and healthy option to moisturize and nourish the skin, especially if it’s on the dry side.

Similar to other emollient plant oils, it’s loaded with nourishing fatty acids: oleic is the main component (55-83%), and also contains linoleic (3.5-20%) and palmitic acids (7-20%). It also contains antioxidant polyphenols, tocopherols (types of vitamin E) and carotenoids and it’s one of the best plant sources of skin-identical emollient, Squalene.

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Overall, a great option for dry skin but less so for acne-prone or damaged skin.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

Jojoba is a drought resistant evergreen shrub native to South-western North America. It’s known and grown for jojoba oil, the golden yellow liquid coming from the seeds (about 50% of the weight of the seeds will be oil).

At first glance, it seems like your average emollient plant oil: it looks like an oil and it’s nourishing and moisturizing to the skin but if we dig a bit deeper, it turns out that jojoba oil is really special and unique: technically – or rather chemically – it’s not an oil but a wax ester (and calling it an oil is kind of sloppy).

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So what the heck is a wax ester and why is that important anyway? Well, to understand what a wax ester is, you first have to know that oils are chemically triglycerides: one glycerin + three fatty acids attached to it. The fatty acids attached to the glycerin vary and thus we have many kinds of oils, but they are all triglycerides. Mother Nature created triglycerides to be easily hydrolyzed (be broken down to a glycerin + 3 fatty acid molecules) and oxidized (the fatty acid is broken down into small parts) – this happens basically when we eat fats or oils and our body generates energy from it.

Mother Nature also created wax esters but for a totally different purpose. Chemically, a wax ester is a fatty acid + a fatty alcohol, one long molecule. Wax esters are on the outer surface of several plant leaves to give them environmental protection. 25-30% of human sebum is also wax esters to give us people environmental protection.

So being a wax ester results in a couple of unique properties: First, jojoba oil is extremely stable. Like crazy stable. Even if you heat it to 370 C (698 F) for 96 hours, it does not budge. (Many plant oils tend to go off pretty quickly). If you have some pure jojoba oil at home, you should be fine using it for years.

Second, jojoba oil is the most similar to human sebum (both being wax esters), and the two are completely miscible. Acne.org has this not fully proven theory that thanks to this, jojoba might be able to “trick” the skin into thinking it has already produced enough sebum, so it might have “skin balancing” properties for oily skin.

Third, jojoba oil moisturizes the skin through a unique dual action: on the one hand, it mixes with sebum and forms a thin, non-greasy, semi-occlusive layer; on the other hand, it absorbs into the skin through pores and hair follicles then diffuses into the intercellular spaces of the outer layer of the skin to make it soft and supple.

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On balance, the point is this: in contrast to real plant oils, wax esters were designed by Mother Nature to stay on the surface and form a protective, moisturizing barrier and jojoba oil being a wax ester is uniquely excellent at doing that.

Unless you live under a rock you must have heard about shea butter. It’s probably the most hyped up natural butter in skincare today. It comes from the seeds of African Shea or Karite Trees and used as a magic moisturizer and emollient.

But it’s not only a simple emollient, it regenerates and soothes the skin, protects it from external factors (such as UV rays or wind) and is also rich in antioxidants (among others vitamin A, E, F, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate). If you are looking for rich emollient benefits + more, shea is hard to beat.

  • Primary fat-soluble antioxidant in our skin
  • Significant photoprotection against UVB rays
  • Vit C + Vit E work in synergy and provide great photoprotection
  • Has emollient properties
  • Easy to formulate, stable and relatively inexpensive

It’s the most commonly used version of pure vitamin E in cosmetics. You can read all about the pure form here. This one is the so-called esterified version.

According to famous dermatologist, Leslie Baumann while tocopheryl acetate is more stable and has a longer shelf life, it’s also more poorly absorbed by the skin and may not have the same awesome photoprotective effects as pure Vit E.

We don’t have description for this ingredient yet.

Citric acid comes from citrus fruits and is an AHA. If these magic three letters don’t tell you anything, click here and read our detailed description on glycolic acid, the most famous AHA.

So citric acid is an exfoliant, that can – just like other AHAs – gently lift off the dead skin cells of your skin and make it more smooth and fresh.

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There is also some research showing that citric acid with regular use (think three months and 20% concentration) can help sun-damaged skin, increase skin thickness and some nice hydrating things called glycosaminoglycans in the skin.

But according to a comparative study done in 1995, citric acid has less skin improving magic properties than glycolic or lactic acid. Probably that’s why citric acid is usually not used as an exfoliant but more as a helper ingredient in small amounts to adjust the pH of a formulation.

It’s pretty much the current IT-preservative. It’s safe and gentle, but even more importantly, it’s not a feared-by-everyone-mostly-without-scientific-reason paraben.

It’s not something new: it was introduced around 1950 and today it can be used up to 1% worldwide. It can be found in nature – in green tea – but the version used in cosmetics is synthetic.

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Other than having a good safety profile and being quite gentle to the skin it has some other advantages too. It can be used in many types of formulations as it has great thermal stability (can be heated up to 85°C) and works on a wide range of pH levels (ph 3-10).

It’s often used together with ethylhexylglycerin as it nicely improves the preservative activity of phenoxyethanol.

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