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how to make your marijuana plant grow faster

If you don’t fancy forcing flowering straight away, but still want to speed up the vegetative phase, you can expose your plants to 24 hours of light using the sun during the day and artificial lights at night. Just be aware that this may bring unwanted attention to your growing operation.

The ideal temperament of a cannabis grower is patience. However, sometimes things need to be stepped up a gear. To grow cannabis faster, it’s key to start with faster genetics and an understanding of light cycles.

To initiate flowering and increase the speed of the flowering phase, a light cycle of 12 hours on and 12 hours off is usually recommended. There is, however, the option to run an 11/13 light cycle, which will make your plant hurry up in fear of the approaching change of seasons. Some growers do both, starting with 12/12 at the beginning of bloom, then moving to 11/13 at the latter half of the phase.

HOW TO CONTROL LIGHT EXPOSURE OUTDOORS

Pollination is usually something growers strive to avoid. When pollen makes contact with flowers, they become fertilised and seed formation starts. This means energy that would otherwise be directed toward flower growth is instead directed to the formation of seeds. However, by pollinating your flowers by hand approximately 1 week before harvest, you will force them to mature faster. Be sure to harvest them before seeds begin to form.

Gardening is usually a slow, meditative, and therapeutic process. It isn’t a hobby that revolves around instant gratification. Long-term investment and hard work pay off months after the seeds have been sown. Watching the slow and steady growth of plants whilst you stroll around a grow room or garden is deeply satisfying, and makes experiencing the fruits of your labour at harvest time that much richer.

However, by providing 24 hours of light per day, you will force your plants to remain in an anabolic state (the process of converting smaller molecules into larger molecules). This is because they will be photosynthesising around the clock and constantly using light, CO₂, and water to create glucose as an energy source to fuel growth.

The light cycle will need to be changed during the flowering phase depending on the genetics being used. Autoflowering strains don’t require a change, a topic we’ll delve into later in this article. However, traditional photoperiod strains require extended periods of darkness to begin flowering. This trait is due to the rhythms of nature; plants evolved to begin flowering when the days begin to get shorter and the harsher conditions of autumn approach. Lack of light is a signal for them to begin reproduction.

By super cropping (high-stress training) or using LST (low-stress training) methods such as tying down the top branches, you can motivate the rest of the surrounding branches to develop, thus creating a more level canopy. What happens when you train your plants is the growth hormones that are focused on the main stalk are redistributed to the surrounding branches, promoting growth for the entire plant. This results in an even canopy of branches that will all grow large colas while being equal distance from the light source.

If you want to improve the yield of your plant, the best method is to prune away any plant life that isn’t receiving quality light. Trim away the buds and foliage that are under the canopy to “lollipop” your plant. This strategy will send all the energy into the canopy where the buds are receiving the most light, thus giving you bigger, denser nugs.

Training

Intuitively, you might think that more nodes means more and larger buds, but this is far from the truth. Nodes with buds that are lower down on the plant away from the canopy will try to develop in flowering but will never become fully developed because they do not receive adequate light.

Correctly feeding your plant is absolutely necessary when trying to grow large buds. Nitrogen is associated with vegetative growth, while phosphorus is the nutrient that is most closely associated with flowering plants. Feeding a plant nitrogen while it is vegging creates a healthy, vibrant plant at a young age that will grow rapidly, which leads to increased yields.

If growing outdoors, make sure your pots or trenches are spaced far enough apart so that the sides of the plants can receive full sun. Growing on a south-facing slope will guarantee your plants are receiving as much sun as possible.

You can speed up the flowering phase by one to two weeks by using a product such as Bushmaster. However, it will also stop vertical growth. The best option is to grow your plants to about the height you want to maintain while in the vegetative phase then start dosing it with Bushmaster. This can also increase yields, so it’s a win-win. Be very careful, though, as this stuff is potent and can cause root burn.

A practical solution, if you are really impatient, is to cut short the vegetative phase. The yield will be less but much more than by entirely skipping the vegetative stage. Let your plants vegetate for a shorter period than that accepted in order to switch to flowering more quickly. The yield will certainly not be extraordinary, but always more than by making the plant flower from the sowing stage. It could take three more weeks, for example, in which case you will be able to harvest after about 14-15 weeks.

2. Speeding up the flowering phase

When growing cannabis indoors from ordinary seeds, the grower has to decide when to switch the plants from the vegetative phase to flowering. This is usually done by altering the lighting schedule. Reducing the total hours of daylight stimulates the plants to produce buds and will start the flower stage. This is usually about two to three months after sowing, depending on the variety.

Another method is to switch your plants to 10 hours of light per day, which will encourage your plants to ripen more quickly. This method works best on Indica varieties which have a shorter flowering cycle than Hazes and Sativa’s, as well as higher yields.

Planting clones rather than germinating seeds yourself will save a couple of weeks. Clones are plug plants that are sold with an established root system, so all you have to do is pop them into the soil. The downside is that clones are genetically weaker and less likely to survive than plants grown from seeds, as they are more likely to succumb to pests, mold and disease.