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how to make weed bud

Cannabis plants grown outdoors will naturally enter the flowering stage in the fall as the days start getting shorter.

The exception to this rule about light schedules is auto-flowering (ruderalis) strains of cannabis, which will automatically start flowering on their own regardless of what light schedule they’re kept under. Most auto-flowering plants start making buds around 3-4 weeks after germination, though some strains take a little longer.

When growing cannabis plants indoors, the grower usually needs to artificially change the light schedule to get plants to start flowering (producing buds).

Why isn’t my weed plant growing buds? How do I get it to start flowering?

Second stage of Life – Flowering Stage
(plants start growing gender-specific parts like buds and pollen sacs)

Whether growing indoors or outdoors, the stage of your cannabis plant is usually determined by light schedules.

To get cannabis to start making buds:

Keep in mind that this is a fairly advanced technique, and should only be attempted by intermediate-advanced growers or particularly brave newcomers.

So for example, Northern Lights has a flowering stage length of about 8 weeks. If you flowered a Northern Lights strain plant from seed, your buds would be ready to harvest in about 11-12 weeks.

Auto-flowering strains of marijuana contain higher levels of CBD, a cannabinoid which has been associated with many medical benefits. So they may be the perfect choice for a medical marijuana user who needs to harvest quickly.

6.) Pay Attention To Your Plants and Quickly React to Problems

For example, the following plant problems will add time onto your grow

About Nebula Haze:

That means that once you've started flowering a specific strain, there isn't a whole lot good options to speed things up during the flowering stage.

Many Indica hybrids (such as AK-48 and Northern Lights) naturally have very short flowering periods of only 7-9 weeks, which is a shorter flowering time than most other strains.

Alternatively, you could also move your plants into a garage, cellar, or shed at night; just remember that the area needs to be 100% light-proof for the plants to start flowering properly.

Our fast-flowering strains, for example, are specially bred to flower in as little as 40 days. Our experienced breeders have developed these strains especially for growers looking to get to harvest sooner or pump out multiple harvests per season.

In general, however, cannabis plants will start flowering after the June solstice (June 20th or 21st, depending on the year) in the Northern Hemisphere and after the December solstice (December 20th or 21st) in the Southern Hemisphere. Keep in mind that the switch to bloom is a lot more gradual outdoors, as daylight hours decrease by a matter of minutes every day.

How to Force Cannabis Flowering Outdoors

You don’t need to be living in Tierra del Fuego or Oslo to be intrigued by the idea of force-flowering your outdoor plants. In fact, a lot of outdoor growers opt to force their plants into bloom to produce multiple harvests throughout the year. Some experienced growers even produce perpetual harvests approximately every two weeks throughout the growing season.

While force-flowering is pretty simple, there are a couple of things you’ll want to keep in mind to make sure the process goes down smoothly.

Areas far north or south of the equator tend to have long, harsh winters that set in a lot earlier than in other areas of the globe. If you’re growing outdoors in northern Europe or southern Argentina, for example, you may want to force your plants to flower a little early to avoid early winter frosts or rain destroying your harvest.

Photoperiod cannabis plants start to flower at the end of summer (following the summer solstice), once the days get shorter and the nights grow longer. Latitude obviously has a big impact on when weed flowers, as it correlates to the number of daylight hours in a particular region.