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how to buy from a dispensary

Many world-renowned seed banks are overseas in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, and other countries where cannabis laws are less restricted. Seed banks provide seeds from a variety of different breeders.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

Autoflower plants change from the vegetative to flowering state with age, not the changing of their light cycle. They have a short grow-to-harvest time and can be ready to harvest in as little as 2 ½ to 3 months from when you put the seeds in the ground. The downside is that, typically, they are less potent, but autoflower seeds are great for people who want to grow cannabis but don’t want to spend a lot of time doing it.

Because US federal law still prohibits cannabis, it can be hard to find information on seed banks and breeders. Breeders who have a long history and positive reputation are usually a good place to start. To get an idea of what well-established breeders look like, check out:

Seed banks exist outside of the US and can sell them for “souvenir purposes,” but it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds they find in packages or on a person.

Every day for the past six years, hundreds of people walk into a legal cannabis dispensary for the first time. Maybe one opens up down the block, or you drive across town, even over to a neighboring state to see it for yourself. It’s one of the few places you can go right now, since they’ve been deemed essential businesses. Dispensaries have adapted to the COVID-19 retail era with increased delivery services, curbside pick-up, and limits on capacity to maintain safe distances, with many stores are doing more business than usual as people stock up to stay home. The one thing that all first-time customers have in common, regardless of the extent one has enjoyed cannabis prior to this moment, is a shared sense of unfamiliarity. This isn’t like walking into a liquor store at 21, but it also won’t be anything like exchanging $20 for a ziplock on your former dealer’s couch. It’s a completely new kind of experience, and despite how recent its debut, one that has already developed its own standard customs and etiquette.

Now that you’ve got your goodies, resist the urge to light up any combustibles near the shop. In every state that has legalized cannabis so far, it still isn’t legal to consume in public. And for all these shops operating under strict regulation, it’s especially un-chill to smoke the stuff you just bought directly out front.

"The more fluent you are in the language of dispensaries, the more likely you are to get great service and leave with something that delivers the effects you seek."

Most dispensaries aren’t allowed to have products on the sales floor, available for grab and go. In almost all cases, you’ll have a dedicated budtender serving you who will guide you through the section of the store’s offerings and pull out flower samples for you to smell. This is when you share what effects you’re looking for or what type of products you seek. It’s also when you can embrace your curiosity. While budtenders are not licensed medical professionals, they do know these products. They’re the only ones who’ve probably sampled every product in that store, and they listen to testimonials all day, every day. So while budtenders aren’t doctors, they are the most equipped to answer any questions about what you see on the shelves. Don’t underestimate their insight. Budtenders aren’t therapists or your personal drug dealer either. Don’t ask where to smoke weed nearby, or how best to fly this purchase home. You could cost them their job, and there’s the internet for those questions.

So why do these unspoken codes of conduct matter to you? Because the more fluent you are in the language of dispensaries and the budtenders that run them, the more likely you are to get great service and walk out of there with something that delivers the effects you seek. Here is the ultimate guide to shopping at a dispensary.

Updated on 4/6/2021 at 5:22 PM

For CommCan, about 60% of its sales are derived from flower, with its second-biggest seller being its line of vape cartridges called DRiP, said Rosenfeld. After that follows concentrates and edibles, then tinctures and topicals.

If that budtender can’t answer your question, another one probably does, said CommCan CEO Marc Rosenfeld. They’re trained to know about the products, which ones might benefit you, and how to use them if you have any questions, he said.

Terpenes, which give certain strains their smell or taste, and other components, can be more beneficial for someone over just a high amount of THC, said Medeiros. Terpenes, like Limonene, can be useful for mood-boosting. Cannabinoids, like CBN, can help you sleep better, he said. Customers can find this information on the product labels or by searching for the specific strain online.

Who is going to cannabis dispensaries?

At Apotho Therapeutics, about 45% of its sales are from flower and 20% of its sales from pre-rolls, said Medeiros. He’s also noticed that Levias and other edibles have been taking off and that more people have been trying concentrates.

“It’s a true melting pot,” he said about the variety of customers coming in, also represented by an equally diverse staff.

“Some people think the higher the THC percentage it must be a better product, and that’s actually not the case,” said Spolijaric. “It’s much more about the terpenes.”

At Garden Remedies, the most common age group is 25 to 40 years old, said Spolijaric. At Apotho Therapeutics, most of its customers range from 45 to 65 years old said Medeiros, and are more often than not women.