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how long does it take a marijuana seed to grow

Vegetative stage length: 3-16 weeks

Be mindful to increase your watering as the plant develops. When it’s young, your plant will need water close to the stalk, but as it grows the roots will also grow outward, so start watering further away from the stalk in the soil so roots can stretch out and absorb water more efficiently.

Take meticulous notes on when and how you perform each step, as well as what the weather is like. Other notes can include how much water you give plants, at what intervals, and how much nutrients you give them. Pictures will also give you a better sense of how your plants look along the way.

Seedling stage

Cannabis plants are considered seedlings until they begin to develop leaves with the full number of blades on new fan leaves. A healthy seedling should be a vibrant green color.

If you’re growing indoors, you can force a weed plant to flower after only a few weeks when it’s small, or after several weeks when it’s big. If you’re growing outdoors, you’re at the whim of the seasons and will have to wait until the sun starts to go down in fall for it to flower and then to harvest.

If you’re growing outdoors in the Northern Hemisphere, growers usually get their seeds between February and April, and you should start your seeds by the end of April. Some growers will start their seedlings inside in a more controlled environment because seedlings are more delicate, and then put their seeds in the ground outside once they’re a little bigger. If you’re growing clones or autoflowers, you have a grace period of another month or so. Plants usually need to be outside, in the ground, by the end of June.

Vegetative plants appreciate healthy soil with nutrients. Feed them with a higher level of nitrogen at this stage.

The time of germination depends not only on the method of germination. It also depends on the quality of the seed which in turn can be affected by the age of the seed, its fertility and the way it has been stored.

If you’re wondering how much time it takes to finish growing a cannabis plant, the first thing to understand is that the art of growing cannot be rushed, quite the opposite. After all, Rome wasn’t built in a day either. The same applies to growing marijuana plants.

Phase 2 – Growth phase

Let’s start this explanation by distinguishing the different phases of plant development:

Methods of germinating cannabis seeds vary. The most common is soaking in water followed by germination on wet kitchen paper. Other growers use methods such as moist cotton, planting directly into the soil or germinating in a Jiffy pot.

This process generally takes between 2 and 6 weeks. Ripening is complete when the bud cracks when you gently pull it.

Whether you’re growing cannabis or something else entirely, you can learn everything you need to know about how easy it is to grow with Grobo on our site and we’ve got tons of educational videos on our YouTube channel, including how to germinate seeds with Grobo.

Ignoring the environmental factors listed above, germination rate is most influenced by how long the seed has been dormant. The seeds with the highest germination rate will be those planted within a year of being harvested from the mother plant. This is because they are newer seeds, and are more viable.

With Grobo you can grow from seeds or clones, and our state of the art grow box also reduces smell. Grobo users can expect to grow approximately 2 to 3 ounces every 3 or 4 months.

Germinate Seeds With Grobo

Exact advice will depend on which germination method you’ve chosen, but we’ve found there are two simple tips that work for all germination methods.

For indoor plants like flowers and herbs, many follow the usual 7 to 10 day germination period, but it’s well worth researching the exact species you’re growing to inform yourself of the exact length of time, as well as any specific temperature or water requirements your seed might need to thrive.

Let’s get the jargon out the way first. Simply put, germination is the development or growth of a plant from a seed or spore, usually after a period of dormancy (like if the seeds have been sitting in a jar to store them). It’s also known less scientifically as sprouting. During this process, your seed will crack open and sprout a single root, known as a tap root, before beginning the growth stages above the soil.

With all this being said, plants are natural, living things and like all living things, they’re complicated. You can do everything perfectly, meet every environmental requirement and some seeds just won’t germinate. It’s a natural part of growing and certainly not something to be disheartened by if you’re new to growing.