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growing hydroponic marijuana from seed

To get started, you can either buy a premade hydroponics system or, if you’re thrifty and handy, build your own. Make sure your plants are getting adequate light, either naturally or from grow lights, and plenty of ventilation. (If you stick with it, you’ll want to look into getting more precise environmental controls, like an air conditioner.) Check your water for the proper pH level before mixing in your nutrients.

The team at General Hydroponics are the original experts on hydroponic cannabis—and they’ve prepared a whole knowledge library to get you started. Articles for beginners cover the basics and frequently asked questions. Next-level growing resources give you everything you need to know about your growing environment, keeping your plants healthy, and troubleshooting.

There’s a reason hydroponics is such a classic choice for cannabis: It’s easy to set up, it’s space efficient, and without the variability that comes with soil, you can fine-tune your plants’ nutrients for every part of the growth cycle. There’s almost zero guesswork involved, too, thanks to decades of growers that came before you—as long as you’re able to measure things—so it works for beginners and old hands alike.

Getting started with a hydroponic cannabis crop

The simple version: Hydroponics is a way of growing plants with a blend of water and nutrients instead of soil. While humans have been growing plants without soil for eons, technology has developed in the last century. It was used to feed troops in World War II, and later, it would be used to grow lettuce in space.

When hydroponic herb rose to prominence in the 1970s, General Hydroponics, now part of Hawthorne Gardening Company, was right there on the ground floor. By 1976, they’d released their three-part Flora Series, the OG cannabis nutrient system that growers still swear by today.

General Hydroponics’ Flora Series is the simplest way to make sure your plants are well-fed. Your plant gets all the nutrients you need in just three different blends—FloraGro®, FloraBloom®, and FloraMicro®—mixed in different combinations depending on the plant’s growth stage.

Whether you’re just starting out with cannabis cultivation or you’re used to growing using soil, hydroculture is the most foolproof way to get a full, healthy harvest. Here’s what you need to know.

Is Hydroponics Good for Growing Cannabis?

How to Grow Cannabis in DWC

Pros of Hydro

Hydro is a no-brainer for me. Whenever I go back to a hand-watered grow like coco coir, I am always surprised by how much extra time it takes to water plants and remove the runoff. The most intimidating part of hydro is just getting started – after that it’s actually really easy to take care of your plants. In my opinion, hydro is far easier and less time consuming than growing in soil or coco coir once you’re set up. If you are interested in hydro, go for it! If you follow this tutorial you will succeed!

Hydroponics is when you grow your cannabis plant in an inert medium like coco or a reservoir of water, and provide all the nutrients to the plant directly in the water.

When thinking about hydroponics, you might picture a high-tech setup: automated switches, flashing lights, ticking timers. However, the cost of a hydroponic system all depends on how much money you’re willing to splash. They range from a simple plastic bucket all the way to self-draining and flooding systems. To save time, invest in a cheap hydroponic starter kit. These include all of the materials you need to get from seed to harvest. You can purchase one for around £200 (€235).

Wicks are used to passively transport nutrient solution to the roots. One end sits in the nutrient reservoir and the other in the growing container. Wicks pull water from the reservoir to the roots using capillary action.

Benefits of Active Hydroponic Systems

This system allows for periodic feeding. The time when the growing tray is empty allows growers to easily tend to plant roots and harvest plants.

Hydroponic systems are either active or passive, depending on the way they are designed. Active systems involve the movement of nutrient solution using electric pumps and the oxygenation of water using air stones. Passive systems are much more simple, and some rely on capillary action instead of electric pumps to deliver nutrient solution.

Hydroponic cultivation might initially seem like the result of modern advances in technology. But this couldn’t be further from the truth. The origins of growing plants in water goes back thousands of years into human history. The famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon, created in 600 BCE, are theorised to have utilised hydroponic principles. The region located next to the Euphrates was naturally dry and arid. It’s believed the crops of the garden were nurtured using a trickle-system starting at the river.