CBD Oil For Dogs With Lymphoma

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No one wants to discover that their dog has lymphoma, the most common kind of cancer in dogs. Unfortunately, it is the reality for many pet owners. If you have already learned that your dog has lymphoma or fear that it does, read this blog post to learn about the disease and how CBD oil for Lymphoma in dogs may allevia Lymphoma can be a devastating disease and can go undetected until it's too late. CBD may be a viable option for your furry friend who is dealing with Lymphoma! Find out what you need to know here!

Find Relief with CBD Oil for Lymphoma in Dogs

No one wants to discover that their dog has lymphoma, the most common kind of cancer in dogs. Unfortunately, it is the reality for many pet owners. If you have already learned that your dog has lymphoma or fear that it does, read this blog post to learn about the disease and how CBD oil for Lymphoma in dogs may alleviate a lot of emotional and physical pain for your dog and you.

Understanding Lymphoma in Dogs

Lymphoma is a group of cancers that affect humans and dogs that can very simply be described as a cancer of the lymphatic system.

This is a vast and important system in the body that influences the immune system and other crucial bodily functions. Not only does it impact many bodily functions, and therefore interact with many parts of the body, the lymphatic system itself is very complex and dependent on its various parts for each basic function. The whole system and its point for existing depends on movement all over the body, so lymphoma is not as contained as we think of most cancers. It doesn’t start in one place with one tumor

and hopefully stay there for a long time. It is far too likely for lymphoma to spread all over the body, and quickly.

The Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system is a drainage network involved with both the immune and circulatory system. It is made of up several parts, lymph nodes and other organs such as the spleen, appendix, and tonsils, lymph vessels, and lymph fluid. It’s all about the distribution and cleansing of that lymph fluid.

Lymph fluid is a watery substance that escapes from the circulatory system, and it is made of escaped material dogs need and waste materials. The lymph system picks it up and carries it where it needs to go, which takes it all over the body. If not for the lymph system, this fluid would build up in the body, causing swelling and the buildup of toxins.

While the lymphatic system moves lymph through the body, carrying the good where it needs to go, it also filters out bad things, like germs and toxins. White blood cells are in the lymphatic system, so that immune system action we hear about where white blood

cells attack what isn’t supposed to be in the body goes on in both the blood stream and the lymphatic system.

Canine Lymphoma

Canine lymphoma is a broad term for more the than 30 different types of cancer that attack a dog’s lymphatic system. It is very similar to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in people, so similar that the chemotherapy treatment is almost identical.

It begins like other cancers as a single tumor, but because the lymphatic system’s function is to spread fluid all over the body to various organs, it is not likely to stay that way for long.

There are many types of lymphoma, so they, thankfully, do not all spread at the same rate. Some are more contained. Unfortunately, the most common lymphoma in dogs is one that does spread rapidly, multicentric lymphoma.

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Canine lymphoma is broken up into stages like human cancers. These are based on the degree to which it has spread through the body.

The World Health Organization has designated the lymphoma stages as follows:
  • Stage I – cancer is contained in a single lymph node
  • Stage II – cancer is contained in multiple lymph nodes on one side of the diaphragm (either the top or the bottom of the dog).
  • Stage III – cancer is only contained in the lymph nodes themselves
  • Stage IV – cancer is located in the liver and spleen or hepatosplenomegaly, whether it started there or spread there.
  • Stage V – cancer is in the bone marrow, central nervous system,

Symptoms of Lymphoma in Dogs

The symptoms of canine lymphoma vary by the type of lymphoma, but there are many common symptoms to be on the lookout for.

The first and most common symptom of canine lymphoma is the presence of a swollen lymph node, or several. This will be a firm, rubbery lump underneath your dog’s skin. Thankfully, a swollen lymph node isn’t painful for the dog.

If you know where their lymph nodes are, you can recognize that it is these nodes that are swollen, and if you don’t already know where your dog’s lymph nodes are, you may want to learn and start getting accustomed to feeling for them while petting your dog. Should one or more of these be swollen, you need to get them to a licensed veterinarian as soon as possible.

Take comfort in the fact that it is not guaranteed that a swollen lymph node means cancer. Like with humans, a simple infection can cause it, but because canine lymphoma is so serious, you should waste no time getting it checked out.

While swollen lymph nodes are the most common symptom, they are not always present or easy to feel. Some lymph nodes are located in places where they may be hard to notice. Your vet may notice them during a routine checkup. You can also take the added precaution of making yourself aware of the other common symptoms of canine lymphoma.

Other common symptoms of lymphoma in dogs:

Because there are so many kinds of lymphoma, some of them have very different symptoms.

Cutaneous lymphoma affects their skin, appearing as dry, red, flaky patches that can spread all over their body. It may be accompanied by masses under the skin. This one is a slower-growing lymphoma.

Gastrointestinal lymphoma affects their digestive system, and its symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, foul-smelling excrement, and rapid weight loss.

Mediastinal lymphoma appears as labored or otherwise difficult breathing due to either a mass or a fluid buildup.

Traditional Treatments for Canine Lymphoma

Canine lymphoma is not a curable disease. It can go into remission, but that means it is also likely to return. According to the National Canine Cancer Foundation, the median time before lymphoma returns is 6 to 12 months. In 20 to 25% of cases, dogs live 2 years or longer after the cancer has gone into remission, and even if it returns and they undergo a second treatment, they still have a median survival rate of 336 days. That means canine lymphoma treatments may give your dog an additional 3 years of life, or more.

Surgery is not the primary treatment because of the traveling nature of the disease. Chemotherapy is the most common option, with radiation and surgery being used in conjunction sometimes when it is beneficial to treat a mass or specific area.

Veterinarians treat the dog to hopefully make the cancer go into remission or to manage their symptoms so they can enjoy a higher quality of life. If the cancer goes into remission, there will be no detectable signs of the disease and the dog will suffer no more symptoms unless the cancer returns.

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It is important to start the treatment as soon as possible. Many pet owners are tempted to put off the chemotherapy because their dog does not act sick yet and they fear the treatments will make them sicker than they have to be, but the treatment is much more effective when begun while the dog is in a healthier state. The cancer has a great likelihood of going into remission, whereas, if you put the treatment off until the dog is suffering, remission may no longer be possible.

IVG hospitals reports that “remission is achieved in 80-90% of dogs and typically lasts 6-9 months. The length of remission depends upon many factors including the primary site of the cancer, how sick an animal is at the start of treatment and the extent of disease.”

They also state that dogs that do not undergo treatment can be expected to live only 1 to 2 months. There is critically short time to treat your dog for canine lymphoma.

Side Effects of Chemotherapy in Dogs

Thankfully, chemotherapy is not as hard on dogs as it is on humans. It is possible that they may not suffer any negative side effects at all.

If your dog does suffer negative side effects of chemotherapy, they may be:

CBD Oil for Dogs with Lymphoma

Lymphoma can be a devastating disease and can go undetected until it’s too late. The availability of testing these days has made it more commonly diagnosed, but no one really knows where it comes from. In this article, we will discuss some things to do and how to recognize the signs your dog may have Lymphoma.

What is Lymphoma in dogs?

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that affects white blood cells. This type of cancer typically invades systems responsible for the immune system such as lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow.

What happens to dogs that have Lymphoma?

Lymphoma cells can easily travel around the body looking for another organ to attack. There are many things that can be done to help slow down the spread of these cells or even make them decrease in numbers. Seeing your local veterinarian to help you with treatment options for your dog is always recommended. While not everyone can afford chemotherapy there are many different options on treatment you and your veterinarian can discuss. The goal is to prolong your dog’s life while still maintaining high-quality health and happiness.

What you should look for?

If you think that your dog has lymphoma, the first thing that you will see is swollen lymph nodes. These swellings are usually not painful to the touch. Your dog has external lymph nodes under his chin, mid neck, armpits, groin area, and behind his knees. If you notice any swelling in these locations, take your dog to a veterinarian to have them check for possible lymphoma or even a different type of cancer.

There are also lymph nodes inside the body. If you notice any gastrointestinal signs such as vomiting or diarrhea this can be a sign of GI lymphoma. Lymphoma of the lungs can cause difficulty breathing or coughing. Just because your pet may be showing any of these symptoms it is important not to jump to conclusions as there are many different reasons why they have occurred and usually cancer is not as common. Your dog’s veterinarian can certainly determine through testing what the issue may be.

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What causes lymphoma

While the exact cause of lymphoma is unknown some people think that it can be due to bacteria, viruses, or some kind of chemical exposure. Evidence shows that Lymphoma does have a genetic component to it. There are certain breeds of dogs that are more prone to Lymphoma such as Boxers, Golden Retrievers. The possibility of these genes likely stems from overbreeding and inbreeding to try to maintain pure bloodlines.

What are treatments to dog Lymphoma?

Most dogs who have lymphoma will respond to chemotherapy. The lymphatic system circulates throughout the body thus making it impossible to just remove the one enlarged nodule as it can affect everything. On a positive note the fact that the lymphatic system is linked together throughout the entire body it responds well to treatments like chemotherapy. Just as cancer can move throughout the body so can the treatment which helps lessen or even stop the spread of cancer to other systems.

Side effects

While most people who think of chemotherapy think of that person they know or what they have seen on TV of people who are sick all the time and losing their hair. Dogs do not have the same response to chemotherapy as people. Dogs are not given extremely high dosages of the medications as people get. Veterinarian’s goals are to prolong life with good quality. While sometimes a dog may get sick and feel lethargic most the time they actually seem to feel much better after treatment. Sometimes veterinarians will see vomiting or diarrhea with dogs undergoing chemotherapy and will prescribe medicine to help get them through these unfortunate side-effects. If a dog is sick on the day that they are scheduled for chemotherapy usually the veterinarian will skip that dosage or reschedule them for a later date when they feel much better. Again, the point is to make them feel better, not worse. The goal isn’t to cure cancer but to simply stop the spread of it and prolong the animal’s life.

What are alternatives that will also help

Many people look for other options to help their dog once they get a cancer diagnosis. There are many things that you can give your dog to help shrink the tumor or even help with the side effects of the disease or chemotherapy.

CBD oil

CBD or cannabidiol has recently shown to help pets fight disease such as cancer, skin problems, help with arthritis and increase appetite. CBD is derived from the hemp plant and contains little to no THC. THC is the psychotropic part of the plant. CBD would be a great supplement to give your dog even if they are not fighting cancer as it still promotes overall health benefits.

CBD oil for dog lymphoma

CBD is a great supplement to give to your dog who has lymphoma. If they are undergoing chemotherapy, CBD will help decrease nausea and make them want to eat a little more which will help keep their energy up thus making them feel better while undergoing treatment.

How to find the best CBD oil for dogs

When looking for CBD oil making sure that the products have been tested by a 3 rd party and ensure that they actually contain what they say they contain. The CBD oil that you purchase should say where the hemp is grown and how it is processed. Make sure that this is sourced by a reputable place and contains exactly what it should.

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